A Strange, Sweet Lullaby

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A Strange, Sweet Lullaby


I was up in a mind-blowing

solar system, sitting on

an ice-blue dragon with

glittering, shimmering wings.

My mind was a new shooting star

as I sang in the star-spangled brightness

of a billion bauble-filled vistas.

Far to the left were peppermint moons

while right close by were

peach-coloured, cartwheeling butterflies.

The planets that spun and danced on their

way to distant, dazzling suns

were tiny and topaz and strawberry pink.


The dragon arrowed up, up, up into a

whole new place, and it glowed to the

tip of its tail before it sang in a resonant voice.

It was a strange, sweet lullaby that was

smooth and gloriously soothing.

The peppermint moons listened and

hummed a refrain to the constant streaming

of tinkling platinum particles.

Then we were no longer alone as dragon

after wing-flapping dragon was there,

each with a laughing child on its back.

Where we were going, I cannot say,

but that it was good to be there,

each happy child understood.

The Earth was barely a memory

and the vistas before us were warm

and utterly welcoming.

We put up our hands and clapped

as we sang.


Up, up we soared into

soft, streaming light.

And we never looked back!

Our faces, our eyes, and then

all of us bounced and beamed into

the billion bright baubles and we

each became one of them.


The dragons planed down.

They were going back to Earth.

And us?

We had found a new place

way beyond outer space,

and we were now beautifully

part of it all.


‘Transmogrified?’, ‘Transcended?’

call it what you will,

but we were still us and

also new again,

and it was an absolute thrill.

        © Andrew Pender-Smith 2018

If you enjoyed this poem, you might like to also read ‘THAT’S FANTASTIC!’ by Andrew Pender-Smith. Click on the link to take a look. http://www.amazon.com/dp/B078HF378N

 

 

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2018 – Happy New Year

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Happy New Year to all those who have interacted with me on the Green Monkey Publications website, as well as to those who might have just come across this particular creative space for the first time. Sebastian de Ververt joins me and Craig Carden by saying:

Have de Happee New Year.

Have de fun.

Have de laughter.

Don be naughtee.

Well, not too much…

Take care. Stay healthee.

Keep swinging creativelee.

Frum Sebastian de Vervet,

everyone’s favourite jumpee monkey

 

 

 

Merree Christmas and de Happee New Year

 

Merree Christmas an de Happee New Year

Sebastian de Vervet says dat if you are
de one celebrating Christmas den
‘Merree Christmas’,
an den I’m tinking, tinking it’s also time for
de New Year.

I’m saying, ‘’Happee, Happee New Year.’’
Have some fun.
May de good times come.
Don be naughtee. Well, not too much…

I’m making special wishes for those
into creativity.
May you make your best work yet
be it painting, prose or poetry.

‘’Happee Happee’’

Sebastian de Vervet

Andrew Pender-Smith and Craig Carden of Green Monkey Publications say “Merry Christmas and Happy New Year” too.

 

Rhyming Answers Game

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Rhyming Answers Game

A little lateral thinking can go a long way to encourage the mind to come up with new ideas. The ‘Rhyming Answers Game’ is a fun way to keep thinking fresh. I have used this with students of dramatic arts and English. The game always proves lively and entertaining, and it definitely enhances their abilities as thinkers and communicators.

In essence, they are asked to answer a question in rhyme. It may be one they come up with themselves or one that is given to them. Here are two examples:

Q. Do you like insects?

Answer

No, not really.

They have too many

Spindly legs and when

They move, I think they look

Mad and scary.

Q. Would you love to go to outer space?

Answer

 I think it would be amazing.

I would fly through the Milky Way

And do close-up star gazing.

I’d do flick-flacks all along

Jupiter’s glowing ring

And sing a rock song

I’d float way above every moon

And shout down to Earth ‘’I love

It up here so I won’t be coming back

Any time soon.

………………………………..

That’s it for now. Thank you for reading.       

As per usual, ‘’Happy Creating’’.

Andrew Pender-Smith

Please note: I first came across this game in a book called Party Games for Children by Mary Vivian.

 

 

Sea Horse

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Sea Horse

 

Simply shining

easily gliding

and then beautifully still

 

How peaceful you look

over the tangling seaweed

regal and miniature

slip-sliding away now

easily moving in the soft, blue glow

                                                Andrew Pender-Smith

I wrote a number of acrostics to do with the sea a few weeks ago. You may read them in the earlier posts on acrostics simply by scrolling down. This particular poem appears in the current anthology within the syllabus of  the Speech and Drama Association of South Africa.

Underwater Poems Done as Acrostics Continued …

underwater

Dolphins

Delightful

ocean lovers

leaping

playing

happily

in near-blue sea

spinning, racing, diving

 

Oceans

Cold and clear

endless

and

never-ending vistas of mesmerising,

softly undulating underwater scenes

 

Shark

Sharp

harpoon

arrowing

relentlessly

Ka-Pow!

 

Sea Storm

Savage fury

erupting

across miles of ocean

 

Sending fish scattering

travelling in mad panic

outwitting oscillating currents

rampaging winds whip waves into

mighty jumps and crashes, flaying thousands

                                                     Andrew Pender-Smith                                 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Matter of Perception – Play Time! (Part Three)

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A Jungle Storm

The brightest butterfly in the world

lands flicking, fluttering on

a beautiful jungle flower.

A buck comes to sip from

a silent jungle pool.

Then a jungle storm comes,

loud and strong,

tossing jungle trees,

and the brightest butterfly in the world

waits quietly

beneath soft jungle leaves.

                               Andrew Pender-Smith

The above poem is a short lyric. The poem below also looks at a butterfly in a peaceful jungle setting until a storm arrives. This poem consists of five haiku that have been linked together to create a lyric.

A Jungle Storm

A butterfly on

a forest flower

beautifully there.

A buck comes

to sip from a silent pool

dainty and watching.

Then, a jungle storm

tossing, bashing jungle trees.

Where is the butterfly?

The radiant beauty

is beneath jungle petals

just waiting, quietly.

                                         Andrew Pender-Smith

Which of the poems works better? You decide. Now, how about trying an exercise like this yourself. Perhaps turn a lyric into a narrative or, as I have done, take the thoughts and feelings explored in a lyric and see if you are able to express them just as well, or even better, in a series of haiku. A newspaper report as a ballad or epic? Enjoy experimenting. 

With good luck from me.

Andrew Pender-Smith

Parts one and two were published on the 6th and 7th of July. 

 

 

 

 

A Matter of Perception – Play Time! (Part Two)

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In this second experiment in which prose is turned to poetry, I have used a headline and the first few sentences of a newspaper article.

Brazen Armed Robbery

 Just before closing yesterday, a group of armed men stormed a grocery store and held up the manager and staff at gunpoint. A few terrified shoppers managed to run for cover as shots volleyed through the store.

 Just before closing yesterday, a group of armed men stormed a grocery store and held up the manager and staff at gunpoint. A few terrified shoppers managed to run for cover as shots volleyed through the store.

Brazen Armed Robbery

Just before closing yesterday,

a group of armed men

stormed a grocery store

and held up the manager

and staff at gunpoint.

A few terrified shoppers

managed to

run for cover

as shots

volleyed

through the store.

Which one is more likely to impact on a reader? The two poems that resulted from the prose passages ( See ‘Part One’ for the first.) are not great works of poetry, but hopefully help to illustrate the idea that writers need to be playful explorers if they wish to sharpen the skills required to become a successful communicator.

Happy writing.

Andrew Pender-Smith

 

A Matter of Perception – Play Time! (Part One)

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QUESTION: When do we perceive what we are reading as poetry and when do see consider it to be prose? First look at the following:

Leopards on the Loose

Two leopards escaped from the local zoo today by climbing up a tree that had fallen into their enclosure. It is believed they climbed up the uprooted tree and jumped down from there. One was darted and recaptured. The other is still on the loose. Residents are requested to stay alert. (A short newspaper article.)

Leopards on the Loose

Two leopards escaped

from the local zoo today

by climbing up

a tree that had

fallen

into their enclosure.

It is believed they

climbed up the

uprooted trunk and

jumped

down

from there.

One was darted

and recaptured.

The other is still

on the loose.

Residents are requested to

stay alert.

‘’The eyes see only what the mind is prepared to comprehend.’’ is a useful quote by author Robertson Davies with which to start.  In the context of this discussion it is perhaps more accurate to say the eyes see the way the mind has been trained to perceive. I am limiting this discussion to matters of layout concerning writing and reading when it comes to thoughts and feelings typed or written onto a page. Broadly put, if a writer uses literary conventions pertaining to prose when placing information on a page, it is read as prose. Should a writer employ one of the genres open to poets (lyric, sonnet, narrative, epic, elegy, ballad, haiku), the reader will talk of having read a poem. I have deliberately kept this discussion brief. There is a lot one can find online regarding the inter-workings of the eye, ear and brain. What I am most keen on is encouraging writers to work at putting pen to paper, or fingers to keyboard, and getting them to play around; to experiment and explore. Start with turning prose to poetry and then poetry to prose. Then extend this by working within either one and ask how readers are likely to perceive your work if, for example, you alter sentence, paragraph and chapter lengths or use different fonts and page formats. What, if any, paradigm shifts are likely to occur when a form of presentation is altered? See it as a game. You’re likely to have more fun that way. Keep writing and reading.

Andrew Pender-Smith        

Note: Another prose-to-poetry experiment will be posted in a day or two.